You’re invited to our live launch on Facebook or Zoom!

Our summer internship has focused on exploring various topics related to cardiovascular health disparities and inequities. This work culminated in students-produced videos addressing aspects of cardiovascular disease and the complexities that underlie health disparities. These topics range from identifying the effects of maternal smoking on the likeliness of birthing a preterm baby, heart-healthy diets and food deserts, hypertension and preeclampsia, and how mental health contributes to cardiovascular health and vice versa.

We want to invite you to join our viewing party on Facebook or Zoom! This viewing will be accompanied by the implementation of a survey questionnaire that assesses the impact of these videos. The live launch will occur on July 23rd and July 24th at 12:30 PM (1 Hr). The videos and surveys will remain available until July 29thIt would be great is you could participate and also pass the invitation on to others that you think might be interested!

To participate: 

  1. Just visit our Facebook page, (either for the Livestream on July 23rd/July 24th or afterward) 
  2. watch the videos, 
  3. and take the associated survey before July 29th

In total, there are four videos, each ~10 minutes long, and a post-video survey should take you between 5-10 minutes each. There is no compensation for participating in this event or completing the surveys. The surveys are entirely voluntary, not compensated, and anonymous.

These events will occur via Zoom but will be live-streamed to the Facebook homepage. (Zoom link and password below)

Facebook Program Homepage (VU Summer 2020): https://www.facebook.com/VU-Summer-2020-111718180547357


ZOOM: https://vanderbilt.zoom.us/j/92848460173?pwd=RTRTZklqNk5LMFduNGFUU1lMcnF0dz09
Meeting ID: 928 4846 0173
Password: 12345

Facebook Event page: https://www.facebook.com/events/307230100652501

PAECER-SURE Student-Produced CVD Health Disparities and Inequality Video Series Watch PartyHealth event by VU Summer 2020 on Thursday, July 23 20206 posts in the discussion.www.facebook.com

Finding my Niche

Since I was an elementary school student, I have always found science related subjects to be easier to conceptualize because, despite its jargonistic terminology and very detailed concepts, there always seemed to be a straightforward answer. At least with all the basic elementary sciences we were learning, things seemed to be black and white with not very much room for challenging widely known and accepted concepts or abstract thinking (which was actually fine with me at that point in time). As I trek further along my scientific journey, I’ve began to realize that the entire existence of science and research is based on challenging known ideas and pushing the boundaries to explore unknowns. I’ve realized that even as scientists there is still a tremendous amount of information that we still have yet to understand, or even be aware of for that matter.

As an African American woman, I’ve always been aware of the fact that minority groups tend to be more susceptible to different health outcomes simply on the basis of their skin color and background. Now, the mechanisms in which this occurs is a concept that I would like to delve deeper into. Although the research I assisted with last summer was still in the early stages, the end result is to find trends within particular groups of people (race, smokers vs. non-smokers, age, etc.) that would essentially help with the development of a predictive model that could be used to identify the likelihood of a patient being re-intubated following cardiac surgery. This would then help with the development of an interventional oxygen treatment that could hopefully reduce this likelihood in high risk patients. This experience, along with all that I’ve learned in the VU PAECER-SURE program, has increased my interest in being ableto collect data and use various statistical tests to analyze the data which will allow us to discover relationships between certain variables, explore the mechanism of that relationship, and finally tackle that “How?” question. Only then would we be able to have a chance to provide a solution fit to overcome the health discrepancies we see in our country today.

Cardiovascular Health Disparities and Structural Competencies

By: Alexis Edmonds

Structural competency is the ability for health professionals to understand how symptom expression and disease can be affected by various social determinants of health and public policy.  This concept can be beneficial to cardiovascular health and disease research because we are aware of the fact that a wide range of cardiovascular diseases, and other diseases in general, can affect minority groups disproportionally, and that people of lower socioeconomic status are much more predisposed to developing cardiovascular disease. With structural competency we can begin to investigate the mechanisms in which these upstream factors can ultimately influence the health outcomes of marginalized patients and eventually be able to mend the gaps created by these prevalent health disparities. As these gaps are becoming more exposed from the COVID-19 outbreak, understanding these influences can enable clinicians to tend to their patients both accordingly and effectively. 

My group and I are focusing on hypertension in pregnant women and we hope to highlight the increased likelihood of developing it due to lower income and education levels. Reasons for this increased likelihood, more specifically amongst African American women, range from lower socioeconomic status/educational attainment to their being highly predisposed to cardiovascular disease. Depending on these factors, your ability to incorporate a healthy diet into your lifestyle and actively seek and receive exceptional prenatal care can vary to a tremendous degree.  

In terms of measuring the ability for our projects to address structural competency, asking the audience whether or not they were able to understand how social determinants of health have impact on health outcomes in a survey could help. In our video we aim to highlight how these determinants end up affecting African American women to a greater extent than other racial groups and how they can hopefully take preventative measures to offset these factors. In our administered survey, we anticipate to discover how effective our video was in achieving this. With delivering this information, we have to be sure that it reaches affected communities. Social media can allow our information to be easily spread to a variety of groups. In regards to science communication, I believe that the level in which they are able to understand the topic at hand is directly related our success with science communication. The ultimate goal of science communication is to accurately and effectively deliver information to a general audience who will hopefully understand and apply the information they have learned into their own lives. Specific questions in our survey asking about the audience’s ability to understand the risks, symptoms and effects associated with hypertension during pregnancy (in a very short quiz-like fashion) can help us understand our effectiveness in delivering this information. We will also have questions asking the viewer how likely they are to modify their lifestyle after viewing the video and which preventative measures they would take to do so. This feedback will allow us to determine our success in encouraging the audience to assess the risks present in their current lifestyles.  

https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jama/fullarticle/2767027

Finding my Niche: Biomedical Engineering

By: Alexander Martinez Lopez

Lifetimes are filled with anger, sadness, fear and despair but they are also full of joy, serenity, hope and love. It’s all part of life, and life is hard. Life doesn’t come with a set of instructions, but everyone will experience these ups and down, from everyday challenges to traumatic events. Experiences that affect every person differently and shapes us to have unique thoughts, emotions as well as uncertainty towards what challenges will the future hold for us. However, as Alana Stewart once said, “No matter what kind of challenges or difficulties or painful situations you go through in your life, we all have something deep within us that we can reach down and find the inner strength to get through them.” Science and family have been the major factors in my development of resiliency. My family’s support and my love for science push me every day to face the adversities and hardships I’ve been through.

Science gave me purpose, it was my getaway from all the negatives that were happening around me, but also gave me motivation to face my problems and strive to be an impactful person within my community. Which has always been my goal in life, help those in need or aren’t as fortunate to enjoy good health by using my unlimited curiosity and perseverance. Science and more specifically Biomedical Engineering has given me a platform to explore my curiosities and express my thoughts on engineering in healthcare. It’s astonishing how we continuously develop lifesaving technologies, it drives me to be a part of and to contribute to this scientific community. I’m obviously not a successful scientist with major contributions just yet. However, I’m continuously growing as a scientist and a person to achieve my goals and no matter what difficulties I face on my path to success, I will get through them.

Cardiovascular Heath Disparities and Structural Competency

By: Alexander Martinez Lopez

The COVID-19 pandemic is changing the health care landscape, highlighting an even larger issue of racial/ethnic disparities in health. Rates of adverse outcomes related to COVID-19 can be mapped into zip codes, showing how socioeconomically disadvantaged communities are more vulnerable towards this virus. Some of these individuals don’t possess the option to social distance as they live in multifamily or multigenerational housings. Others have jobs who expose them to the virus, or don’t receive the appropriate income for them to access adequate medical care.

Structural competency is an emerging ideal in health care. It seeks to expand the medical approaches from the biology and behaviors into a bigger picture, addressing the socioeconomical disadvantages that produce unjust health conditions. Fostering health care professionals to recognize, analyze, and intervene upon the structural factors that impact health disparities. Current research suggests that lower levels of educational attainment are associated with a higher prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors, higher incidence of cardiovascular events, and higher cardiovascular mortality. Implementing this structural competency paradigm, which applies to all areas of health care, along with further research of these social determinants of health in cardiovascular health could potentially address the health disparities in cardiovascular disease patients.

Our media project is focused on bringing awareness to the relationship between mental health and cardiovascular disease. It aims to inform non-scientific individuals on how their state of mind can influence and impact their heart health. Not only cultivating a sense of awareness but also ways to protect their heart and mind. Even though this media project is guided towards the non-scientific community, it could be valuable for some health care practitioners as we highlight how socioeconomic factors can also influence this relationship. Metrics are highly important for us to address our videos overall impact. We will utilize pre- and post- surveys to determine if our research was easily understood and will cause a behavioral change.

References

Week Nine: What is going on?

Experimental Design and Hypothesis Testing

iBiology

Let’s Experiment – Experimental design and hypothesis testing

What is the scientific method? How do you ask a “good” scientific questions? What characteristics go into creating a logically sound hypothesis? A well-designed and constructed experiment will be robust under questioning and will focus criticism on conclusions, rather than potential experimental errors. Sound experimental design should follow the established scientific protocols and generate useful statistical comparisons. Using a customized version of iBiology’s “Let’s experiment,” scientists from a variety of backgrounds will give concrete steps and advice to help you build a framework for how to design experiments in biological research. We will use case studies to make the abstract more tangible. In science, there is often no simple right answer. However, with this course, students can develop a general approach to experimental design and hypothesis testing. After completing this course, students will be able to analyze the logic structure hypothesis, define the various components of an experiment, and generate an independent hypothesis.

Blog posts highlighted this week!

2020 VIRTUAL GRADUATE & PROFESSIONAL SCHOOL FAIR OVERVIEW FOR STUDENTS

Aug 3-7th: https://www.training.nih.gov/gp_fair

July 20th

9:45 AM – Pre-meeting chats

10:00 AM – 11:00 AM: Program virtual “huddle”

https://vanderbilt.zoom.us/j/9637959466

OPTIONAL: 11:00 AM-12:00 PM SU – Statin Adherence Across Diverse Populations

Dr. Fatima Rodriguez – https://profiles.stanford.edu/85681

Register in advance for this webinar:
https://stanford.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_bVlDHFWjR8KF6_GwQTvTBA 
Password: CVI@Lokey

1:00 PM – 3:00 PM Video Group Check-in: Final videos are due!!!!!!! START PAPER WRITING 

https://vanderbilt.zoom.us/j/9637959466

July 21st

10:00 AM – 11:00 AM: Free Yoga Session

OPTIONAL: 11:00 AM-12:00 PM – SU – Health Policy and Public Health Career Path Panel

Register in advance for this webinar:
https://stanford.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_bVlDHFWjR8KF6_GwQTvTBA
Password: CVI@LokeyOrganizer: PAECER-SURE ProgramPAECER-SURE ProgramCreator: Created by: Kendra OliverCreated by: Kendra Oliver

2:00 PM – 3:00 PM VU Cardiovascular Science Talk

Quinn Wells, MD, PharmD, MSCI

Join Zoom Meeting: https://vanderbilt.zoom.us/j/95770031891?pwd=eURlQkVzY1dlZjEyd2pPODlPVEtpdz09

Meeting ID: 957 7003 1891. Password: 906417

3:00 PM – 4:00 PM VU MD Panel

Description:

Dr. Fonz Ikeda (SU) – MD Admissions Officer
Joey Barnett, PhD (VU) – https://medschool.vanderbilt.edu/pharmacology/person/joey-v-barnett-ph-d/
Kristen Goodell, MD (BU) – https://www.bumc.bu.edu/busm/profile/kristen-goodell/
Roopal Kundu, MD (NWU) – https://www.feinberg.northwestern.edu/faculty-profiles/az/profile.html?xid=15591

Register in advance for this webinar:
https://stanford.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_bVlDHFWjR8KF6_GwQTvTBA
Password: CVI@Lokey

July 22nd

OPTIONAL: 11:00 AM-12:00 PM – SU – CV Research Talk

Dr. Kristy Red-Horse – https://profiles.stanford.edu/kristy-red-horse

https://stanford.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_bVlDHFWjR8KF6_GwQTvTBA
Password: CVI@Lokey

Description: Dr. Michael Ma – https://profiles.stanford.edu/michael-ma

Register in advance for this webinar: https://stanford.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_bVlDHFWjR8KF6_GwQTvTBA  Password: CVI@Lokey

July 23rd

10:00 AM – 11:00 AM: VU Career Pathway talk – Debra Dixon career talk

https://vanderbilt.zoom.us/j/9637959466

11:00 AM – 12:00 PM: BU PD: Data Visualization

Facilitator : Lisa Sullivan ,PhD, MPH (BUSPH)

Register in advance for this meeting:
https://bostonu.zoom.us/meeting/register/tJ0uduuhqzwsGdwIwCSu3akKr6XLjP-wgtCM

12:00 PM – 1:00 PM : Osher Center for Integrative Medicine at Vanderbilt

https://vanderbilt.zoom.us/j/9637959466

12:30PM – 1:30PM : PAECER-SURE Student-Produced CVD Health Disparities Video Series Viewing Party

Facebook Event Page: https://www.facebook.com/events/307230100652501

Through an NHLBI- and AHA-funded summer research internship at Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, we have been given the opportunity to research various cardiovascular diseases of interest to us. Our projects have focused on exploring various topics related to cardiovascular health disparities and inequities. This work culminated in the production of four videos addressing an aspect of cardiovascular disease and the complexities that underlie health disparities. These topics range from identifying the effects of maternal smoking on the likeliness of birthing a preterm baby, heart-healthy diets and food deserts, Hypertension and preeclampsia, and how mental health contributes to cardiovascular health and vice versa.

We want to invite you to join our viewing party and complete a survey questionnaire that assesses the impact of these videos on July 24th at 12:00 PM. A total of four videos, each of which is shorter than 10 minutes, will be shown and a post-video survey should take you between 5-10 minutes each. In total, this event should take no more than an hour and a half of your time. There is no compensation for participating in this event or completing the surveys.


Join Zoom Meeting
https://vanderbilt.zoom.us/j/92848460173?pwd=RTRTZklqNk5LMFduNGFUU1lMcnF0dz09
Meeting ID: 928 4846 0173
Password: 12345

4:00 PM – 5:00 PM : SU – MyoKardia Visit: Career Panel

https://myokardia.zoom.us/j/98238265404

Welcome students to MyoKardia’s career focused panel! We are excited to virtually meet you and share about our professional journeys with the hope that it blesses yours. 

Agenda:
MyoKardia Intro (5 min)
Intern brief intro (10 min): Name, major, career objective (if known)
Panelists intro (area of study, career path) (15 min): Name, title, what they studied
Discussion addressing questions/areas of focus submitted ahead of time (15 min)
Q&A: (10 min)

Panelists:
Cynthia Kelly, Assoc Dir, Project Team Leader 
Jeff Douglas, Exec Dir, Clinical Operations
Renee Fuller, Patent Counsel
Sarah Fernandes, Sr Project Mgr  

Moderator: 
Vu Nguyen, Recruitment Business Partner

July 24th

11:00 AM – 12:30 PM: SU – Social Determinants of Health

Description:Dr. Fatima Rodriguez – https://profiles.stanford.edu/85681
Dr. Yeuen Kim – https://profiles.stanford.edu/yeuen-kim
Dr. Michelle Albert – https://profiles.ucsf.edu/michelle.albert

12:30PM – 1:30PM : PAECER-SURE Student-Produced CVD Health Disparities Video Series Viewing Party

Facebook Event Page: https://www.facebook.com/events/307230100652501

Through an NHLBI- and AHA-funded summer research internship at Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, we have been given the opportunity to research various cardiovascular diseases of interest to us. Our projects have focused on exploring various topics related to cardiovascular health disparities and inequities. This work culminated in the production of four videos addressing an aspect of cardiovascular disease and the complexities that underlie health disparities. These topics range from identifying the effects of maternal smoking on the likeliness of birthing a preterm baby, heart-healthy diets and food deserts, Hypertension and preeclampsia, and how mental health contributes to cardiovascular health and vice versa.

We want to invite you to join our viewing party and complete a survey questionnaire that assesses the impact of these videos on July 24th at 12:00 PM. A total of four videos, each of which is shorter than 10 minutes, will be shown and a post-video survey should take you between 5-10 minutes each. In total, this event should take no more than an hour and a half of your time. There is no compensation for participating in this event or completing the surveys.

Topic: PAECER-SURE Summer 2020 Video Party
Time: Jul 24, 2020 12:00 PM Central Time (US and Canada)
Join Zoom Meeting
https://vanderbilt.zoom.us/j/92848460173?pwd=RTRTZklqNk5LMFduNGFUU1lMcnF0dz09
Meeting ID: 928 4846 0173
Password: 12345

Navigating Science Through My Lens *

By: Alexandra Filipkowski

Science is an act of “self expression” because it allows me to question and explore my reality. To elaborate, before I was exposed to the world of scientific research I felt that my questions that ranged from topics in health disparities to exercise to mental health could only be answered by a Google search. This being said, I could never explore the answers to my questions for myself – essentially I was never able to determine the WHY or the HOW to answer my questions. Essentially, before my exploration into science I felt I had a brick wall standing between my many scientific questions and the answers. However, with the guidance I have received from the Vanderbilt PAECER research internship and from the “Planning Your Scientific Journey” course I have started to feel like the process of scientifically answering my own questions is not unreasonable, unrealistic or impossible. Now that I have gone through the process of developing my first research question, doing ample reading and collaborating with students and content experts I believe I have finally grasped the reigns of science and now feel comfortable pursuing other research interests in my future. 

Now that I have “grasped the reigns” of scientific research I am excited to explore questions relating to cognition and exercise. Being a Division 1 collegiate athlete I train over 20+ hours a week during the fall season; however, after the season is over I go home for winter break and hardly exercise. I have realized that despite being significantly busier and my body feeling more sore during the fall season I often came to class alert, productive, excited to learn, and overall more euphoric. To the contrary, when I was home on my break I felt slow, and lazy and lacked motivation to even do simple tasks such as emptying the dishwasher. This pattern has happened for the past two years and has made me incredibly interested in the connection between cognition and exercise. In the past, I have done my typical Google searches to try to determine some answer for my sudden lack of motivation upon arriving home. I have found that in general, exercise has a stronger effect than medication on treating anxiety, depression, and other mental issues. However, I want to extend my knowledge on this connection beyond a Google Search – I want to carry out my own research experiment.

I believe from my PAECER Cardiovascular research experience I have gotten the opportunity to learn how to digest complex scientific talks and papers, how to appropriately collaborate with elite researchers and doctors and I have learned how to effectively communicate my science to different audiences. These three pillars are absolutely critical skills that I can add to my toolkit going forward; however, I believe I need to develop more technical skills at the bench in order to gain new lab techniques. As of right now I have only been in the lab for General Biology 1 and 2 and General Chemistry 1 and 2 classes. This being said, I haven’t been able to go into a lab and activate my “scientific self-expression” because I have only been doing required classwork. However, now that I have defined my research interest, I need to move forward and find professors and researchers at my university who also share these same research interests.

One final goal I have is to help implement a class or a lesson plan at my university about how to be an effective scientific communicator. Although this goal isn’t specifically “research oriented” it has become a topic I am extremely passionate about. I believe many individuals are dissuaded from pursuing the sciences because they are greeted with posters and presenters who speak with jargon that sounds like a second language! Additionally, around my university science buildings there are all of these beautiful posters; however, the lay audience would not be able to fathom any of it! This being said, I believe that science loses its greatness if the majority of people can’t understand it. Thus, we need to work to inform our current, and upcoming scientists on the importance of conveying their research in a comprehensible and approachable fashion. I hope to relay this importance to those in the science department at my university to see if I can make real change in this front.

My Journey in Scientific Self Expression

By Davin Means

One thing that Dr. Yamamoto emphasized within the course, Planning Your Scientific Journey, was that individuality and diversity is an absolute necessity within the realm of science. A diversity in thinking, approaches, and backgrounds allows for a conglomerate of unique perspectives that challenges the limits of the known. Diversity in thought is how the field of science advances. As an African American male majoring within a STEM degree, attending a southern,  predominantly white institution, this message spoke to me on a personal level and sparked a deep contemplation upon my role within the scientific community and forced me to reflect upon any potential legacies my interests would enable me to leave upon the field of science. 

Aside from having a family history of hypertension and other cardiovascular complications, my overall interest in cardiovascular medicine and research magnified upon attending a case study oriented advanced medical program at Johns Hopkins University. During this program, we focused primarily on hypertension, coronary artery disease, and heart failure and explored these topics via the perspective of aspiring future medical students. We analyzed a plethora of patient histories, and we did hypothetical rounds with paid patient actors as well as attempted to read echocardiograms with the assistance of resident cardiologists. While at Johns Hopkins, I also did a project which focused on the effects of smokeless tobaccos and how they increase the risk for  oral and esophageal cancer. Thus I exited the Johns Hopkins program during the summer before my Junior year of high school having been instilled with an intense interest in cancer, and cardiovascular related topics. 

After completing my freshman year at the University of Arkansas and all the fundamental biology and chemistry courses attached to those first couple of semesters, I yearned to “get my feet wet”, and explore something extremely specific. One of my mentors suggested I try my hand at research, and the hunt for a suitable lab began. First and foremost, I decided that whatever lab I ended in should focus on either cardiovascular or cancer research. I am all for pushing the boundaries of what is accepted and considered common for my people, thus my desire to research within these fields was magnified when I discovered that only 3% of cardiologists were African American and only  2.3 % of oncologists were African American. Aside from my previously explained exposures into these two branches of science, or the disparity of African American healthcare providers within those fields, or even my families troubled past with cardiovascular disease and cancer, my decision to focus on these disciplines  is validated by the fact that cardiovascular disease and cancer  are the first and second primary cause of death within the United States of America.

After conversing with various principal investigators at my university, I decided to join a lab run by Dr. Narasimhan Rajaram that focuses on using optical imaging to investigate changes in the tumor microenvironment of cancers in response to treatment. Specifically, we are interested in studying the relationship between tumor oxygenation and metabolism, and its role in promoting undesirable tumor outcomes, such as treatment resistance, recurrence, and metastasis. The biomarkers derived from these investigations will lead to the development of optimized whole-tumor imaging methods that can identify patients who will benefit the most from treatment. Within this lab, I have been working with a graduate student on a project that explores the effectiveness of various doses of radiation in regards to mammary cancer treatment. I have become fairly proficient in monitoring tumor growth within lab mice as well as in operating diffuse reflectance spectrometry equipment. I am also proficient at operating mice radiation therapy equipment. After clearly defining some of my current research goals within the Planning Your Scientific Journey course, my PI and I have heavily considered shifting my focus to that of glioblastomas. I would be using metabolic imaging to monitor the tumor’s response to treatment as well as using genetic and RNA sequencing to investigate why some tumors respond to treatment and others do not. This research topic would be used for my honors thesis. 

Outside of academics and research, I have given back to the community by volunteering at the local boys and girls club as well as local libraries. While these forms of community service are personally fulfilling, I have been wanting to shift my service efforts to a more healthcare related goal. The Virtual AHA SURE program at Vanderbilt has done a fantastic job of exposing me to the myriad of ways in which socioeconomic determinants of health impact minority communities and decrease health equity. From the hypertension and stroke awareness and prevention collective impacts mentioned by Dr. Costanza, to the American Heart Association’s government intervention, healthcare advocacy and policy change mentioned by Dr. Herbert, I now have a plethora of ways in which I can promote healthcare equity within the minority populations of my community. 

Aside from the program’s emphasis on health equity and advocacy, the Vanderbilt AHA SURE Program has consistently exposed me to various frontiers within cardiovascular research and fortified my belief in my intended long term career trajectory of becoming a cardiothoracic surgeon. Furthermore the program has drastically increased the effectiveness of my scientific communication.  I have learned to formulate scientific objectives that are testable, as well as how to present information in a way that caters to a very specific audience. I have also learned how to produce scientific writing that is more likely to be accepted by the scientific community. I have learned that challenging a community’s mastery of a subject along with instigating instability and providing value that solves a cost or supplies a benefit is what distinguishes the impactful writing from the ignored. I am extremely thankful to the Vanderbilt AHA SURE program for the skills that I have gained through the course curriculum in conjunction with a phenomenal virtual experience that has promoted profound contemplation in how I can express myself and my individuality through science. 

Week Eight: What is going on?

Experimental Design and Hypothesis Testing

iBiology

Let’s Experiment – Experimental design and hypothesis testing

What is the scientific method? How do you ask a “good” scientific questions? What characteristics go into creating a logically sound hypothesis? A well-designed and constructed experiment will be robust under questioning and will focus criticism on conclusions, rather than potential experimental errors. Sound experimental design should follow the established scientific protocols and generate useful statistical comparisons. Using a customized version of iBiology’s “Let’s experiment,” scientists from a variety of backgrounds will give concrete steps and advice to help you build a framework for how to design experiments in biological research. We will use case studies to make the abstract more tangible. In science, there is often no simple right answer. However, with this course, students can develop a general approach to experimental design and hypothesis testing. After completing this course, students will be able to analyze the logic structure hypothesis, define the various components of an experiment, and generate an independent hypothesis.

COMPLETE ALL ONLINE COURSES!

July 13th

9:45 AM – Pre-meeting chats

10:00 AM – 11:00 AM: Program virtual “huddle” (Plus getting reimbursed for Animaker)

Recording:
https://vanderbilt.zoom.us/rec/share/zMdcK7_q5nNJGaPwymviQY4vRoS-eaa8h3McrPJeyBnej6BEF276sOkOwephnmD0

OPTIONAL: 11:00 AM-12:00 PM – Myocardium Regeneration

Dr. Phillip Yang – https://profiles.stanford.edu/phillip-yang

Register in advance for this webinar:
https://stanford.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_bVlDHFWjR8KF6_GwQTvTBA
Password: CVI@Lokey

1:00 PM – 3:00 PM Health Strategies/Burden and Need 

Recording:
https://vanderbilt.zoom.us/rec/share/6-tKPY-hp0pJHomV7mvTWYAoHpX3X6a8hHMbqfcMy0e9iiAtcWXrKYBAaU5LVe-E

Bruce Inverso, American Health Association Senior Vice-President of Health Strategies, is speaking to the PAECER/SURE scholars at 1 pm.  Below is a description of his discussion on “Health Strategies/Burdens and Needs.”

“The American Heart Association is committed to making an impact throughout the country with a focus on health equity. The AHA continues to work in the community to give all Americans an equitable shot at good health. Bruce will discuss the AHA’s mission, priorities, and future direction.”

COMPLETE ALL ONLINE COURSES!

July 14th

10:00 AM – 11:00 AM: Free Yoga Session

OPTIONAL: 11:00 AM-12:00 PM – Faculty Career Path Talk

Dr. Michael Kapiloff – https://profiles.stanford.edu/michael-kapiloff
Dr. Elsie Ross – https://profiles.stanford.edu/elsie-ross
Dr. Sean Wu – https://profiles.stanford.edu/ming-wu

Register in advance for this webinar: https://stanford.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_bVlDHFWjR8KF6_GwQTvTBA  Password: CVI@Lokey

2:00 PM – 3:00 PM VU Cardiovascular Science Talk

RECORDING: https://vanderbilt.zoom.us/rec/share/7MtIMIrZykhLYIWV5F3GWIN9OqbbX6a803JKrvBZzSWC3IHkiTAAQ9lzWGrnbSY

COMPLETE ALL ONLINE COURSES!

July 15th

10:00 AM – 11:00 AM: Evaluation plan presentation with Max Joffe, Ph.D

Recording:
https://vanderbilt.zoom.us/rec/share/yZxpNZDI7W1LY5XP613nAZMfQ6Psaaa8hyIfr_pZzUd5mEcoGiXtkcrfP4uSiE-l

OPTIONAL: 11:00 AM-12:00 PM –SU – Congenital heart defects

Description: Dr. Michael Ma – https://profiles.stanford.edu/michael-ma

Register in advance for this webinar: https://stanford.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_bVlDHFWjR8KF6_GwQTvTBA  Password: CVI@Lokey

1:00 PM – 3:00 PM Video Group check-in: IRB Final Submissions

COMPLETE ALL ONLINE COURSES!

July 16th

10:00 AM – 11:00 AM: VU Career Pathway talk

RECORDING: https://vanderbilt.zoom.us/rec/share/1M0tCa3A_zJORqfs-RzmA4U4F5zgT6a81CYe-vIMxExifM5r1GBbHGxtZ60oLmoj

11:00 AM – 12:00 PM: SU – Graduate Admissions Panel Bioengineering and Molecular Pharmacology

Katy Bechler – https://profiles.stanford.edu/intranet/kathryn-klemme
Elizabeth Kay
James Chen – https://profiles.stanford.edu/intranet/james-chen
Ashby Morrison – https://profiles.stanford.edu/ashby-morrison

https://stanford.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_bVlDHFWjR8KF6_GwQTvTBA
Password: CVI@Lokey

COMPLETE ALL ONLINE COURSES!

July 17th

11:00 AM – 12:00 PM: Osher Center for Integrative Medicine at Vanderbilt

https://vanderbilt.zoom.us/j/9637959466

5:00 PM – 7:00 PM: OPTIONAL SU – Technique Demonstration

Alexa Wnorowski – https://profiles.stanford.edu/intranet/alexa-wnorowski

https://stanford.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_bVlDHFWjR8KF6_GwQTvTBA
Password: CVI@Lokey

COMPLETE ALL ONLINE COURSES!

Finding My Niche

By: Bianca Walker

Throughout middle and high school, I always found myself drawn to science and math. They were my favorite subjects and I was one of the few students who chose them over subjects like english and history. My eleventh-grade year is when I really discovered that science is what I would like to pursue my career in. On November 3rd, while my sister was celebrating her birthday, I received a call from the hospital stating that my mom had a heart attack along with flatlining twice and having multiple seizures. I found myself baffled because how could a forty-six year old women whose never had any health issues have her life turned upside down at the blink of an eye. After my mom’s surgery, the doctor came into the room to talk to her about the steps that she needs to take so that something like this doesn’t happen again. I remember him explaining to her that she doesn’t need to eat fried foods, red meats, and other types of foods that could increase her chances of having another heart attack. I remember researching all of the variables that can cause a heart attack because we eat very healthy and had not eaten fried foods and red meats in years. A few days later, my mom realized that before her heart attacked, she had been very stressed and this is what could have possibly caused the events that followed.

My mom’s story is why I chose to go into medicine. Opportunities like the HBCU Scholars Program and PACER are helping me find my niche and love for cardiovascular disease. As an HBCU Scholar, I was given the chance to explore research on pulmonary arterial hypertension and the effects that TGFBR3 receptor had on mitochondria. While this summer as a PACER scholar, I have been learning about pregnancy and cardiovascular disease, specifically preeclampsia. Along with the many skills and techniques that I have learned over my research experience, every day I discover the importance of research and medicine. Science is endless because there is always more research that can be further explored or a peculiar medical case that needs to be solved. Knowing that one day I will be one of the many people who can push medicine further brings me joy. 

Even though science has its trials, to me it’s about being able to do something I love while being able to give back to my community in the process. When I have a challenging class or assignment, I think about the bigger picture, what I want to accomplish in life, and that I have a purpose for what I’ve chosen. One way I do this is by thinking about my favorite show “All American”. On a particular episode, the main character, which is a teenage black male, got shot in a drive-by. When he arrived at the hospital, the doctor and nurse on staff had prejudged him, assuming that his life wasn’t valuable enough for their resources because they believed that he was in a gang. In the process of them failing to give him the care that he needed, it was the black nurse who took control over the situation and ended up saving his life. This episode is one of my reminders that life can change in an instance, and its situations like this that remind me why it is so important for not only myself, but for underrepresented people to go into healthcare. I was lucky enough to have a mother who knew the importance of taking me to black doctors when I was sick or for check-ups, so that I was able to see first-hand and know that what I want to be is achievable. Becoming a doctor and being able to teach others about health gives me the unique opportunity to express apart of myself, while achieving one of my biggest goals in life.